#nycthenandnow Instagram Photos & Videos

Hashtag Popularity

22.7
average comments
1.7k
average likes
@annswer1108 Profile picture

@annswer1108

In 1906, architect Charles Stegmayer designed an "eye-catching if unusual, stone, brick and cast-iron facade dominated by a yawning arch at eye level with the passing Third Avenue El" as it traveled through the neighborhood of Yorkville a German enclave. Its design elements included "Corinthian pilasters, leafy swags and an arcade. Above it all a steep mansard attic level leaned back from the cornice" A stationer and German immigrant, Max Roth, who'd had a business across the street, moved in. Ten years later, he leased space to a creator and purveyor of fake food for display by restaurants and other food sellers. Both businesses closed during the Great Depression. In 1933, furniture dealers Willy Bolle and Emil Detzel, also German immigrants, moved in. Shot 1 (DOF) shows the building around 1940. In this building the two owners started a German language radio station. What it broadcasted came under FBI scrutiny and in 1942 the two owners were arrested for broadcasts "giving direct aid to the Nazis" Subsequently the building housed a television and electronics store. The above information is all from the blog "The Daytonian", June, 2016. By 1990, S. Cavallo Mirror Fair, an antiques, mirror and furnishings business occupied the building (shots 2 and 3, Google Street May 2011) until around 2015. Today (shots 4 and 5) it is occupied by Rumble, a type of health club. #nyhistory #nychistory #nycthenandnow #yorkville #oldnyc #oldnewyorkcity

In 1906, architect Charles Stegmayer designed an "eye-catching if unusual, stone, brick and cast-iron facade dominated by a yawning arch at eye level with the passing Third Avenue El" as it traveled through the neighborhood of Yorkville a German enclave.  Its design elements included "Corinthian pilasters, leafy swags and an arcade.  Above it all a steep mansard attic level leaned back from the cornice"  A stationer and German immigrant, Max Roth, who'd had a business across the street, moved in. Ten years later, he leased space to a creator and purveyor of fake food for display by restaurants and other food sellers.  Both businesses closed during the Great Depression.  In 1933, furniture dealers Willy Bolle and Emil Detzel, also German immigrants, moved in.  Shot 1 (DOF) shows the building around 1940.  In this building the two owners started a German language radio station.  What it broadcasted came under FBI scrutiny and in 1942 the two owners were arrested for broadcasts "giving direct aid to the Nazis"  Subsequently the building housed a television and electronics store. The above information is all from the blog "The Daytonian", June, 2016.  By 1990, S. Cavallo Mirror Fair, an antiques, mirror and furnishings business occupied the building (shots 2 and 3, Google Street May 2011) until around 2015.  Today (shots 4 and 5) it is occupied by Rumble, a type of health club.  #nyhistory #nychistory #nycthenandnow #yorkville #oldnyc #oldnewyorkcity
28 2 12 hours ago
@urbanarchiveny Profile picture

@urbanarchiveny

Bedford–Stuyvesant, Brooklyn

#mansardmonday Then and Now!⠀
.⠀
This is the rectory of the Church of St. Lucy – St. Patrick at 285 Willoughby Street in #BedStuy. The parish was originally founded in 1843 as St. Mary's, but was renamed for St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland in 1856. The red brick Romanesque church, designed by famed NYC Catholic church architect Patrick Keely (swipe to see the church) was dedicated in 1856. In 1974 the church merged with a nearby Italian parish called St. Lucy's. After a massive merger between 2007 and 2011, this church along with the parishes of Sacred Heart (founded 1875) and St Michael –St Edward (founded 1890) combined to become Mary of Nazareth Parish. Services are offered here on Willoughby Street as well as at 41 Adelphi Street. ⠀
.⠀
2nd photo: Eugene L. Armbruster, 1922, @nypl
#urbanarchive #nychistory #brooklyn #stpatrick #catholicchurch #patrickkeely #redbrick #stillstanding #rectory #mansard #thenandnow #nycthenandnow

#mansardmonday Then and Now!⠀
.⠀
This is the rectory of the Church of St. Lucy – St. Patrick at 285 Willoughby Street in #BedStuy. The parish was originally founded in 1843 as St. Mary's, but was renamed for St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland in 1856. The red brick Romanesque church, designed by famed NYC Catholic church architect Patrick Keely (swipe to see the church) was dedicated in 1856. In 1974 the church merged with a nearby Italian parish called St. Lucy's. After a massive merger between 2007 and 2011, this church along with the parishes of Sacred Heart (founded 1875) and St Michael –St Edward (founded 1890) combined to become Mary of Nazareth Parish. Services are offered here on Willoughby Street as well as at 41 Adelphi Street. ⠀
.⠀
2nd photo: Eugene L. Armbruster, 1922, @nypl⠀
#urbanarchive #nychistory #brooklyn #stpatrick #catholicchurch #patrickkeely #redbrick #stillstanding #rectory #mansard #thenandnow #nycthenandnow
698 11 12 hours ago
@old.newyorkcity Profile picture

@old.newyorkcity

Brooklyn Heights Promenade

1948 - Cantilevered BQE under construction in Brooklyn heights. The BQE was originally intended to cut right through the historic Brooklyn heights neighborhood, but opposition forced designers to come up with a new idea. The Triple Cantilever was opened in 1954, with three westbound lanes, three eastbound, and a public promenade to view the Manhattan skyline.

1948 - Cantilevered BQE under construction  in Brooklyn heights. The BQE was originally intended to cut right through the historic Brooklyn heights neighborhood, but opposition forced designers to come up with a new idea. The Triple Cantilever was opened in 1954, with three westbound lanes, three eastbound, and a public promenade to view the Manhattan skyline.
1,474 22 16 hours ago
@old.newyorkcity Profile picture

@old.newyorkcity

Flatiron Building

1916 - Flatiron Building

1916 - Flatiron Building
4,211 47 12 October, 2019
@old.newyorkcity Profile picture

@old.newyorkcity

City Hall, New York City

1907 - City Hall with subway entrances to the old City Hall Station. They were designed with Turkish-style headhouses.

1907 - City Hall with subway entrances to the old City Hall Station. They were designed with Turkish-style headhouses.
1,213 5 11 October, 2019
@annswer1108 Profile picture

@annswer1108

Morrisania, 1947, moving day. In early 1947, my parents moved out of their basement apartment in a tenement in Tremont (See my October 2 post) and rented a two-story wood frame house in Morrisania, on Park Avenue between East 169th and 170th Streets. Shot 1, my father opens the front door for the first time. Shot 2, my mother sits on the front porch. Notice the front door is made up of glass panels: the neighborhood was that safe. Shot 3, my father looks out of the back door into his new backyard. Shot 4, the house was so small DOF didn't even take a picture of it, it only appears in the corner of the shot of its larger southern neighbor. It's hard to see but both houses are below street level. That's because the NY Central Railroad used to run at street level on Park Avenue which was then appropriately known as Railroad Avenue, until 1893, when the street level was raised while the tracks were lowered, creating what has been since effectively an open cut. That shows both houses were built before 1893. By 1960, the entire block was demolished and replaced with housing projects. Shot 6 is the same site today. That used to be my family's home. #bronxhistory #oldbronx #vintagebronx #bronxnostalgia #bronxmemories #Morrisania #bronxneighborhoods #bronxnarratives #oldnewyorkcity #nycthenandnow #vanishingnewyork #bronxfamilyhistory #bronxstreets #oldnyc #oldnewyorkcity

Morrisania, 1947, moving day. In early 1947, my parents moved out of their basement apartment in a tenement in Tremont (See my October 2 post) and rented a two-story wood frame house in Morrisania, on Park Avenue between East 169th and 170th Streets.  Shot 1, my father opens the front door for the first time.  Shot 2, my mother sits on the front porch. Notice the front door is made up of glass panels: the neighborhood was that safe. Shot 3, my father looks out of the back door into his new backyard. Shot 4, the house was so small DOF didn't even take a picture of it, it only appears in the corner of the shot of its larger southern neighbor. It's hard to see but both houses are below street level. That's because the NY Central Railroad used to run at street level on Park Avenue which was then appropriately known as Railroad Avenue, until 1893, when the street level was raised while the tracks were lowered, creating what has been since effectively an open cut.  That shows both houses were built before 1893.  By 1960, the entire block was demolished and replaced with housing projects. Shot 6 is the same site today.  That used to be my family's home. #bronxhistory #oldbronx #vintagebronx #bronxnostalgia #bronxmemories #Morrisania #bronxneighborhoods #bronxnarratives #oldnewyorkcity #nycthenandnow #vanishingnewyork #bronxfamilyhistory #bronxstreets #oldnyc #oldnewyorkcity
73 9 10 October, 2019
@old.newyorkcity Profile picture

@old.newyorkcity

1918 - 58th St station; end of the line for the Sixth Ave El. The station was opened by the Gilbert Elevated Railway on June 5, 1878, and served as the northern terminus of the IRT Sixth Avenue Line trains until the line was acquired by the Manhattan Railway Company and built a connecting spur from 50th Street Station (the next southbound stop) along 53rd Street to the Ninth Avenue Elevated. It was closed on June 16, 1924 and demolished shortly thereafter.

1918 - 58th St station; end of the line for the Sixth Ave El.  The station was opened by the Gilbert Elevated Railway on June 5, 1878, and served as the northern terminus of the IRT Sixth Avenue Line trains until the line was acquired by the Manhattan Railway Company and built a connecting spur from 50th Street Station (the next southbound stop) along 53rd Street to the Ninth Avenue Elevated.  It was closed on June 16, 1924 and demolished shortly thereafter.
1,615 14 10 October, 2019
@nyc.thenandnow Profile picture

@nyc.thenandnow

Cherry Lane Theatre

1925 & now: Commerce Street facing Bedford Street. 🍒 #nycthenandnow

1925 & now: Commerce Street facing Bedford Street. 🍒 #nycthenandnow
3,829 64 9 October, 2019
@annswer1108 Profile picture

@annswer1108

In 1940, when the neighborhood was Yorkville, this three story building stood at the corner of Third Avenue. In the East 80s, in the shadow of the Third Avenue El with the ground floor retail space empty. (shot 1, DOF) Today, (shot 2) once again that retail space, and now the whole building is empty. In between, it housed a (not so great) pizzeria from at least 1980 to the early 1990s (shot 3, DOF), when the Highland Cafe, a (not so great) diner took over the space (shot 4, Google Street) until the middle of December 2018 when there was a fire there. Since then, the building sits derelict and vacant, (shot 5) awaiting its fate. #vanishingnewyork #nycthenandnow #oldnyc #oldnewyorkcity #yorkville

In 1940, when the neighborhood was Yorkville, this three story building stood at the corner of Third Avenue. In the East 80s, in the shadow of the Third Avenue El with the ground floor retail space empty. (shot 1, DOF)  Today, (shot 2) once again that retail space, and now the whole building is empty.  In between, it housed a (not so great) pizzeria from at least 1980 to the early 1990s (shot 3, DOF), when the Highland Cafe, a (not so great) diner took over the space (shot 4, Google Street) until the middle of December 2018  when there was a fire there.  Since then, the building sits derelict and vacant, (shot 5) awaiting its fate. #vanishingnewyork #nycthenandnow #oldnyc #oldnewyorkcity #yorkville
62 2 9 October, 2019
@rennerts_gallery Profile picture

@rennerts_gallery

Rennert's Gallery

We’re preparing for the opening of our viewing on Friday, and we can’t wait for you to take in the views. Seen here is Harley Wood’s breathtaking “New York / Pennsylvania Railroad,” one of the many gems in our October 27 auction.

We’re preparing for the opening of our viewing on Friday, and we can’t wait for you to take in the views. Seen here is Harley Wood’s breathtaking “New York / Pennsylvania Railroad,” one of the many gems in our October 27 auction.
217 3 9 October, 2019
@old.newyorkcity Profile picture

@old.newyorkcity

Santander Bank US - Branch

1896 - The Herald Building, in Herald Square at 35th St and Sixth Ave/ Broadway. Built in 1895, it was modeled after the Palazzo del Consiglio in Verona Italy (built in 1476), to be the headquarters of the NY Herald Newspaper. It was demolished in 1940 in two sections. Today the first half is a bank (the lower two story part) and the rest is an Art Deco Office tower.

1896 - The Herald Building, in Herald Square at 35th St and Sixth Ave/ Broadway.  Built in 1895, it was modeled after the Palazzo del Consiglio in Verona Italy (built in 1476), to be the headquarters of the NY Herald Newspaper.  It was demolished in 1940 in two sections.  Today the first half is a bank (the lower two story part) and the rest is an Art Deco Office tower.
1,446 15 9 October, 2019
@annswer1108 Profile picture

@annswer1108

In 1940,(shot 1 DOF photo) when the neighborhood was Yorkville, this little two-story building on Third Avenue in the 80s was squeezed between tenements, overshadowed by the Third Avenue El and obscured by large advertising signs. Today, (shot 2) its two neighbors have been replaced by postwar apartment buildings, the advertising signs are gone, revealing the date the little building went up, 1895. But how much longer can this valiant little survivor hold out? #oldnyc #oldnewyorkcity #nycthenandnow #vanishingnewyork #yorkville

In 1940,(shot 1 DOF photo)  when  the neighborhood was Yorkville, this little two-story building on Third Avenue in the 80s was squeezed between tenements, overshadowed by the Third Avenue El and obscured by large advertising signs.  Today, (shot 2) its two neighbors have been replaced by postwar apartment buildings, the advertising signs are gone, revealing the date the little building went up, 1895.  But how much longer can this valiant little survivor hold out?  #oldnyc #oldnewyorkcity #nycthenandnow #vanishingnewyork #yorkville
54 4 8 October, 2019
1908 - Times Square
2,515 41 8 October, 2019
@nyc.thenandnow Profile picture

@nyc.thenandnow

Lower East Side

1978 & now: 45 Essex Street. #nycthenandnow

1978 & now: 45 Essex Street. #nycthenandnow
3,395 62 7 October, 2019
@urbanarchiveny Profile picture

@urbanarchiveny

Gingerbread House

Hansel? Gretel? Nope, just the Gingerbread House! (a fun #thenandnow from yesterday's scavenger hunt in #BayRidge)⠀
.⠀
The house that would become widely became known as "The Gingerbread House" was built in the early 1900s and designed by architect J. Sarsfield Kennedy. The home's distinctive Arts and Crafts style set it apart from many of the surrounding estates.⠀
.⠀
Kennedy had designed the nearby boathouse of the prestigious Crescent Club. Perhaps it was the architect's design of that building that convinced Howard E. Jones, the wealthy president of the shipping firm James Ewell and Co, to commission him for a private home. Work on the Gingerbread House began in 1917. The house that sprung forth on the ample grounds purchased by Jones was made of natural material, its uncut stone and thatched roof evoking a fairy tale home in a European forest rather than a Bay Ridge estate. ⠀
.⠀
#urbanarchive #nychistory #gingerbreadhouse #brooklyn #artsandcrafts #quirkyarchitecture #stiilstanding #nycthenandnow #appfeature #nycarchives #nycrecords #doris

Hansel? Gretel? Nope, just the Gingerbread House! (a fun #thenandnow from yesterday's scavenger hunt in #BayRidge)⠀
.⠀
The house that would become widely became known as "The Gingerbread House" was built in the early 1900s and designed by architect J. Sarsfield Kennedy. The home's distinctive Arts and Crafts style set it apart from many of the surrounding estates.⠀
.⠀
Kennedy had designed the nearby boathouse of the prestigious Crescent Club. Perhaps it was the architect's design of that building that convinced Howard E. Jones, the wealthy president of the shipping firm James Ewell and Co, to commission him for a private home. Work on the Gingerbread House began in 1917. The house that sprung forth on the ample grounds purchased by Jones was made of natural material, its uncut stone and thatched roof evoking a fairy tale home in a European forest rather than a Bay Ridge estate. ⠀
.⠀
#urbanarchive #nychistory #gingerbreadhouse #brooklyn #artsandcrafts #quirkyarchitecture #stiilstanding #nycthenandnow #appfeature #nycarchives #nycrecords #doris
1,146 23 7 October, 2019
@old.newyorkcity Profile picture

@old.newyorkcity

1908 - Manhattan Bridge under construction.

1908 - Manhattan Bridge under construction.
2,034 16 7 October, 2019
@old.newyorkcity Profile picture

@old.newyorkcity

Grand Central Terminal

1930 - Grand Central Terminal ticket booths. $2.25 for a trip to Albany! You can’t even cross the Triboro anymore for twice that!

1930 - Grand Central Terminal ticket booths. $2.25 for a trip to Albany! You can’t even cross the Triboro anymore for twice that!
1,873 23 6 October, 2019
@urbanarchiveny Profile picture

@urbanarchiveny

This exuberant (and 'then' ivy-covered) building features a dominant corner tower, contrasting brick and terra cotta, and stained glass from its days as the Reformed Episcopal Church of the Reconciliation. The building is notable for its architects. George Lewis Heins and Christopher Grant LaFarge met while studying at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and both trained under the renowned architect H.H. Richardson. A year after this church was completed, they won the design contest for the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in Manhattan. They later became the designers of stations and buildings for the city’s first subway system, the IRT, in 1901. The church sold the building in 1923 to the Greenpoint Masonic Lodge No. 403. In 1944 the structure became home to the Most Worshipful Enoch Grand Lodge, an African-American Masonic organization, which remains today. ⠀
.⠀
text via @hdcnyc
#urbanarchive #nychistory #brooklyn #bedstuy #BedfordStuyvesant #church #formerchurch #grandlodge #enochlodge #freemasons #heinsandlafarge #nycthenandnow #thenandnow #appfeature

This exuberant (and 'then' ivy-covered) building features a dominant corner tower, contrasting brick and terra cotta, and stained glass from its days as the Reformed Episcopal Church of the Reconciliation. The building is notable for its architects. George Lewis Heins and Christopher Grant LaFarge met while studying at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and both trained under the renowned architect H.H. Richardson. A year after this church was completed, they won the design contest for the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in Manhattan. They later became the designers of stations and buildings for the city’s first subway system, the IRT, in 1901. The church sold the building in 1923 to the Greenpoint Masonic Lodge No. 403. In 1944 the structure became home to the Most Worshipful Enoch Grand Lodge, an African-American Masonic organization, which remains today. ⠀
.⠀
text via @hdcnyc⠀
#urbanarchive #nychistory #brooklyn #bedstuy #BedfordStuyvesant #church #formerchurch #grandlodge #enochlodge #freemasons #heinsandlafarge #nycthenandnow #thenandnow #appfeature
1,170 4 6 October, 2019
@old.newyorkcity Profile picture

@old.newyorkcity

Williamsburg Bridge

1947 - Williamsburg Bridge

1947 - Williamsburg Bridge
4,042 23 5 October, 2019
@urbanarchiveny Profile picture

@urbanarchiveny

James Watson House

The eastern portion of the James Watson House (9 State Street) was built as a Federal Style townhouse in 1793, at a time when prominent merchants maintained residences in close proximity to their business interests in the Harbor. In 1806, Moses Rogers, a relative of Archibald Gracie, purchased the house and elected to combine it with an adjacent house, via a curved colonnaded portico designed by John McComb, Jr.⠀
.⠀
In 1885, the Watson house was incorporated into the Mission of Our Lady of the Rosary, an aid organization addressing the needs of immigrant women arriving at the Castle Garden intake facility in Battery Park, and later Ellis Island. ⠀
.⠀
Today the building at no. 7 (at left) is the Shrine of St. Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton. Seton, born in 1774 in Lower Manhattan, was the first native-born American citizen to achieve sainthood. The shrine is build on the site of the former Seton home, while the James Watson House now serves as its rectory.⠀
.⠀
#urbanarchive #nychistory #manhattan #jameswatsonhouse #fidi #financialdistrict #ElizabethAnnSeton #americansaint #federalstyle #thenandnow #nycthenandnow #appfeature #NYHS @nyhistory

The eastern portion of the James Watson House (9 State Street) was built as a Federal Style townhouse in 1793, at a time when prominent merchants maintained residences in close proximity to their business interests in the Harbor. In 1806, Moses Rogers, a relative of Archibald Gracie, purchased the house and elected to combine it with an adjacent house, via a curved colonnaded portico designed by John McComb, Jr.⠀
.⠀
In 1885, the Watson house was incorporated into the Mission of Our Lady of the Rosary, an aid organization addressing the needs of immigrant women arriving at the Castle Garden intake facility in Battery Park, and later Ellis Island. ⠀
.⠀
Today the building at no. 7 (at left) is the Shrine of St. Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton. Seton, born in 1774 in Lower Manhattan, was the first native-born American citizen to achieve sainthood. The shrine is build on the site of the former Seton home, while the James Watson House now serves as its rectory.⠀
.⠀
#urbanarchive #nychistory #manhattan #jameswatsonhouse #fidi #financialdistrict #ElizabethAnnSeton #americansaint #federalstyle #thenandnow #nycthenandnow #appfeature #NYHS @nyhistory
1,792 20 5 October, 2019
@theghostofqueenspast Profile picture

@theghostofqueenspast

Then and now - 1925 to 2016

Then and now - 1925 to 2016
1,264 14 5 October, 2019
@old.newyorkcity Profile picture

@old.newyorkcity

Park Row (Manhattan)

1906 - City Hall with the World Building, Tribune Building, and Times Building in Newspaper Row (now Park Row). The Brooklyn Bridge is on the far left. The Times Building still stands as the oldest surviver of Newspaper Row (1889). The American Tract Society Building also still stands (1895). The World was demolished in the 50s for the on-ramp of the Brooklyn Bridge. The Tribune Building was demolished in 1966 to build One Pace Plaza.

1906 - City Hall with the World Building, Tribune Building, and Times Building in Newspaper Row (now Park Row). The Brooklyn Bridge is on the far left.  The Times Building still stands as the oldest surviver of Newspaper Row (1889). The American Tract Society Building also still stands (1895). The World was demolished in the 50s for the on-ramp of the Brooklyn Bridge.  The Tribune Building was demolished in 1966 to build One Pace Plaza.
1,925 13 4 October, 2019
@flatbush_history Profile picture

@flatbush_history

FIB Forever Ink Bar

I think it’s a testament to our entrepreneurial awesomeness that Flatbush has so many bars that are also something else. We have a bar/coffeeshop (@ervsonbeekman), a bar/flowershop (@sycamorebklyn/ @honeysucklehill), a bar/vintage guitar shop (@barchordbrooklyn) and this cute yet edgy lil’ gem, @fibtattoobar, a bar/tattoo studio on Flatbush Ave near @kingsbklyn. // Here it is in the present day and in the 1940s, when it still had the top to its half turret! I wish I had a crazy story to tell you, like a plane crashed into it, it caught on fire, and one of the Ditmases had to put it out, but yeah, it was probably just cheaper to take it off than maintain it. // Lots more history and photos coming soon, my day job has me busy! .
.
.
.
#nycthenandnow #1940s #flatbushhistory #flatbushave #turrets #turrettuesday #newyorkphotos #nycstreetscenes #brooklynarchitecture #tattoostudio #brooklynbars #barsofbrooklyn #slashbar

I think it’s a testament to our entrepreneurial awesomeness that Flatbush has so many bars that are also something else. We have a bar/coffeeshop (@ervsonbeekman), a bar/flowershop (@sycamorebklyn/ @honeysucklehill), a bar/vintage guitar shop (@barchordbrooklyn) and this cute yet edgy lil’ gem, @fibtattoobar, a bar/tattoo studio on Flatbush Ave near @kingsbklyn. // Here it is in the present day and in the 1940s, when it still had the top to its half turret! I wish I had a crazy story to tell you, like a plane crashed into it, it caught on fire, and one of the Ditmases had to put it out, but yeah, it was probably just cheaper to take it off than maintain it. // Lots more history and photos coming soon, my day job has me busy! .
.
.
.
#nycthenandnow #1940s #flatbushhistory #flatbushave #turrets #turrettuesday #newyorkphotos #nycstreetscenes #brooklynarchitecture #tattoostudio #brooklynbars #barsofbrooklyn #slashbar
82 5 4 October, 2019
@nychealthsystem Profile picture

@nychealthsystem

KINGS COUNTY HOSPITAL

#TBT to this old NYC Health + Hospitals ambulance. Just last week, we unveiled our newest ambulance design, which will ensure safe, efficient transport of our patients throughout the health system. 🚑 Check out our new fleet!
.
.
.
Images description: Black-and-white photo shows an old NYC Health + Hospitals ambulance. A new series of photos shows the redesigned ambulances.
#nychealthsystem #ambulances #oldtimenyc #vintagenyc #nychistory #nycthenandnow #patienttransport #ambulance #patientsafety

#TBT to this old NYC Health + Hospitals ambulance. Just last week, we unveiled our newest ambulance design, which will ensure safe, efficient transport of our patients throughout the health system. 🚑 Check out our new fleet!
.
.
.
Images description: Black-and-white photo shows an old NYC Health + Hospitals ambulance. A new series of photos shows the redesigned ambulances.
#nychealthsystem #ambulances #oldtimenyc #vintagenyc #nychistory #nycthenandnow #patienttransport #ambulance #patientsafety
97 0 3 October, 2019
@old.newyorkcity Profile picture

@old.newyorkcity

Ebbets Field

1950 - Ebbets Field, Brooklyn. Dodgers' owner Charles Ebbets acquired the property over several years, starting in 1908, by buying lots until he owned the entire block. The land included the site of a garbage dump called Pigtown. Completed in 1913, the first game played was an inter-league exhibition game against the New York Yankees on April 5, 1913, played before an overcapacity of 30,000 fans, with 5,000 more who had arrived but were not able to get in. In the mid 50s, OMalley, now the owner of the Dodgers, was publicly trying to secure rights for a new stadium, battling with Robert Moses over different sites. When the two couldn’t come to an agreement, he moved the team to Los Angeles. He also urged Horace Stoneham, owner of the Dodgers' long-time crosstown rivals, the New York Giants, to also move west. Stoneham, who was having stadium difficulties of his own, agreed, and moved the Giants to San Francisco after the 1957 season. Ebbets Field was demolished in 1960 and the Ebbets Field apartments (now named the Jackie Robinson apartments) were built in the site.

1950 - Ebbets Field, Brooklyn. Dodgers' owner Charles Ebbets acquired the property over several years, starting in 1908, by buying lots until he owned the entire block. The land included the site of a garbage dump called Pigtown. Completed in 1913, the first game played was an inter-league exhibition game against the New York Yankees on April 5, 1913, played before an overcapacity of 30,000 fans, with 5,000 more who had arrived but were not able to get in.  In the mid 50s, OMalley, now the owner of the Dodgers, was publicly trying to secure rights for a new stadium, battling with Robert Moses over different sites. When the two couldn’t come to an agreement, he moved the team to Los Angeles. He also urged Horace Stoneham, owner of the Dodgers' long-time crosstown rivals, the New York Giants, to also move west. Stoneham, who was having stadium difficulties of his own, agreed, and moved the Giants to San Francisco after the 1957 season. Ebbets Field was demolished in 1960 and the Ebbets Field apartments (now named the Jackie Robinson apartments) were built in the site.
1,827 29 3 October, 2019
@annswer1108 Profile picture

@annswer1108

South Bronx, 1940s, moving day. After my father got out of the army in 1946, he and my mother lived in a basement apartment in a tenement between Park and Webster Avenues in the East 170s. Shot 1 is my father walking up the stairs from the apartment to the street the day they moved out. Shot 2 shows the same scene today. Shot 3, my mother leaving their old digs, shot 4, the same scene today. Shot 5 shows the tenement around 1940 and the last shot shows it today. #bronxhistory #oldbronx #vintagebronx #bronxnostalgia #bronxmemories #bronxfamilyhistory #bronxneighborhoods #bronxstreets #bronxnarratives #vanishingnewyork #nycthenandnow

South Bronx, 1940s, moving day.  After my father got out of the army in 1946, he and my mother lived in a basement apartment in a tenement between Park and Webster Avenues in the East 170s. Shot 1 is my father walking up the stairs from the apartment to the street the day they moved out.  Shot 2 shows the same scene today.  Shot 3, my mother leaving their old digs, shot 4, the same scene today.  Shot 5 shows the tenement around 1940 and the last shot shows it today. #bronxhistory #oldbronx #vintagebronx #bronxnostalgia #bronxmemories #bronxfamilyhistory #bronxneighborhoods #bronxstreets #bronxnarratives #vanishingnewyork #nycthenandnow
100 8 2 October, 2019
@constructionguide.nyc Profile picture

@constructionguide.nyc

Empire State Building

Amazing transformation Fulton Market Building 1883 and 2016

#constructionguide
#consultingfirm
#nycthenandnow

Amazing transformation Fulton Market Building 1883 and 2016

#constructionguide
#consultingfirm
#nycthenandnow
33 1 2 October, 2019
@old.newyorkcity Profile picture

@old.newyorkcity

1943 - It’s supposed to be 91F in the city today.... Sunbathing on the roof of an apartment building in Tudor City. The Waldorf Astoria and 30 Rock Center can be seen in the distance.

1943 - It’s supposed to be 91F in the city today.... Sunbathing on the roof of an apartment building in Tudor City. The Waldorf Astoria and 30 Rock Center can be seen in the distance.
2,152 31 2 October, 2019
@leecasbeer Profile picture

@leecasbeer

Central Park, Manhattan, New York City

Checking out some ancestral locations in Manhattan: 400 years ago a large stream followed the course of 106th St. all the way to the Harlem River, called “Montagne’s Spring” after my grandfather (14 generations back) Johannes de la Montagne, whose home and tobacco plantation was situated here. He named the farm Vredendahl, which meant “Valley of Peace”, and he did live in peace with the surrounding Lenape Indians whose language he learned. That ended when Dutch settlers in nearby Nieuw Amsterdam (later renamed New York when the British conquered it) accused the Indians of stealing a couple of pigs from a farm and the newly arrived director ordered a massacre of an entire Lenape village, against the Dutch colonist’s wishes. That resulted in the joining of all surrounding tribes against the Dutch and all those on isolated farms had to seek refuge in the walled village of Nieuw Amsterdam for years. (It turned out to be Dutch sailors who had stolen the pigs). Johanne’s son Willem returned to the farm and eventually divided it up to create the Dutch village of Nieuw Harleem. One of his great-great grandaughters married Gottleb Kasebier in Pennysylvania, son of German immigrants, and by the time their grandson Thomas came around the spelling was “Casbeer”. Thomas left the Pennsylvania farm and disappeared into the Tennessee wilderness, and that branch of Casbeers evolved into backwoods frontier people, making their way to Texas by 1839. The rocky outcropping where “Montagne’s Spring” comes out from is now paved over by a skating rink in Central Park near where I am standing, it still bubbles out of the ground just below that and feeds into Harlem Meer(lake) before disappearing beneath the modern city. With some imagination you can still see the primordial forest that once surrounded this spot, and that peaceful valley that a called to a European exile back in 1636, ready for a fresh start in a new world...
#nyc #nychistory #manhattan #newyorkcityhistory #nycityworld #newyorkcity #genealogy #casbeer #urbansketching #urbansketch #manhattanhistory #nycthenandnow #thenandnow

Checking out some ancestral locations in Manhattan: 400 years ago a large stream followed the course of 106th St. all the way to the Harlem River, called “Montagne’s Spring” after my grandfather (14 generations back) Johannes de la Montagne, whose home and tobacco plantation was situated here. He named the farm Vredendahl, which meant “Valley of Peace”, and he did live in peace with the surrounding Lenape Indians whose language he learned.  That ended when Dutch settlers in nearby Nieuw Amsterdam (later renamed New York when the British conquered it) accused the Indians of stealing a couple of pigs from a farm and the newly arrived director ordered a massacre of an entire Lenape village, against the Dutch colonist’s wishes. That resulted in the joining of all surrounding tribes against the Dutch and all those on isolated farms had to seek refuge in the walled village of Nieuw Amsterdam for years. (It turned out to be Dutch sailors who had stolen the pigs). Johanne’s son Willem returned to the farm and eventually divided it up to create the Dutch village of Nieuw Harleem. One of his great-great grandaughters married Gottleb Kasebier in Pennysylvania, son of German immigrants, and by the time their grandson Thomas came around the spelling was “Casbeer”. Thomas left the Pennsylvania farm and disappeared into the Tennessee wilderness, and that branch of Casbeers evolved into backwoods frontier people, making their way to Texas by 1839.  The rocky outcropping where “Montagne’s Spring” comes out from is now paved over by a skating rink in Central Park near where I am standing, it still bubbles out of the ground just below that and feeds into Harlem Meer(lake) before disappearing beneath the modern city. With some imagination you can still see the primordial forest that once surrounded this spot, and that peaceful valley that a called to a European exile back in 1636, ready for a fresh start in a new world...
#nyc #nychistory #manhattan #newyorkcityhistory #nycityworld #newyorkcity #genealogy #casbeer #urbansketching #urbansketch #manhattanhistory #nycthenandnow #thenandnow
159 19 1 October, 2019
@old.newyorkcity Profile picture

@old.newyorkcity

1949 - A Boeing 377 Stratocruiser (not a DC-3!) flies by the Empire State Building with views of the west side of manhattan.

1949 - A Boeing 377 Stratocruiser (not a DC-3!) flies by the Empire State Building with views of the west side of manhattan.
2,351 26 1 October, 2019
@nyc.thenandnow Profile picture

@nyc.thenandnow

The James Hotel Nomad

1905 & now: Hotel Seville (now The James Hotel) on the SW corner of Madison Avenue & 29th Street. In love with this building- wish I could live here! #nycthenandnow

1905 & now: Hotel Seville (now The James Hotel) on the SW corner of Madison Avenue & 29th Street. In love with this building- wish I could live here! #nycthenandnow
4,068 49 1 October, 2019
@old.newyorkcity Profile picture

@old.newyorkcity

Graybar

1928 - The Graybar Building, at 43rd St and Lexington Ave. Completed in 1927, the Graybar Building was one of the last structures erected in “Terminal City,” an East Midtown development on property above the railroad tracks owned by New York Central Railroad. An integral part of Grand Central Terminal, this 30-story office building incorporates multiple train platforms, as well as a broad public passageway that connects the station with Lexington Avenue. At the time, it was considered the worlds largest office building (by Sq Ft). It got its name from one of its tenants, Graybar Electric, who as an initial tenant signed a 19 year lease and financed a portion of the building in return for naming rights.

1928 - The Graybar Building, at 43rd St and Lexington Ave. Completed in 1927, the Graybar Building was one of the last structures erected in “Terminal City,” an East Midtown development on property above the railroad tracks owned by New York Central Railroad. An integral part of Grand Central Terminal, this 30-story office building incorporates multiple train platforms, as well as a broad public passageway that connects the station with Lexington Avenue. At the time, it was considered the worlds largest office building (by Sq Ft). It got its name from one of its tenants, Graybar Electric, who as an initial tenant signed a 19 year lease and financed a portion of the building in return for naming rights.
3,852 20 30 September, 2019
@annswer1108 Profile picture

@annswer1108

In 1946, my father left the army and he and my mother lived in this tenement (shot 1, in 1940) in Tremont between Webster and Park Avenues. Shot 2 shows the same building today. #bronxfamilyhistory #bronxneighborhoods #bronxnarratives #oldnewyorkcity #bronxnostalgia #bronxmemories #oldnyc #vintagebronx #bronxnostalgia #nycthenandnow #bronxstreets

In 1946, my father left the army and he and my mother lived in this tenement (shot 1, in 1940) in Tremont between Webster and Park Avenues.  Shot 2 shows the same building today. #bronxfamilyhistory #bronxneighborhoods #bronxnarratives #oldnewyorkcity #bronxnostalgia #bronxmemories #oldnyc #vintagebronx  #bronxnostalgia #nycthenandnow #bronxstreets
112 2 29 September, 2019
@urbanarchiveny Profile picture

@urbanarchiveny

Louis Armstrong House Museum

Check out the home where 🎺 player Louis Armstrong made music. 🎶 ⠀
.⠀
This unassuming little house at 34-56 107th Street in #Corona, Queens was home to jazz great Louis Armstrong and his wife Lucille. But more than just their home, it housed a recording studio and was where Armstrong worked on new music and entertained visiting musicians. The house is now run as a museum and archive of his work.⠀
.⠀
#urbanarchive #nychistory #queens #louisarmstrong #jazz #icon #trumpetplayer #housemuseum #thenandnow #nycthenandnow #appfeature #doris #deptofrecords

Check out the home where 🎺 player Louis Armstrong made music. 🎶 ⠀
.⠀
This unassuming little house at 34-56 107th Street in #Corona, Queens was home to jazz great Louis Armstrong and his wife Lucille. But more than just their home, it housed a recording studio and was where Armstrong worked on new music and entertained visiting musicians. The house is now run as a museum and archive of his work.⠀
.⠀
#urbanarchive #nychistory #queens #louisarmstrong #jazz #icon #trumpetplayer #housemuseum #thenandnow #nycthenandnow #appfeature #doris #deptofrecords
1,134 19 29 September, 2019
@old.newyorkcity Profile picture

@old.newyorkcity

1920s - The convergence of the Sixth Ave El and the Ninth Ave El at the Battery Place stop in lower Manhattan. The rents must have been really low in that middle building....

1920s - The convergence of the Sixth Ave El and the Ninth Ave El at the Battery Place stop in lower Manhattan. The rents must have been really low in that middle building....
3,167 34 29 September, 2019
@nyc.thenandnow Profile picture

@nyc.thenandnow

NoMad, Manhattan

1911 & now: NW corner of 27th & Madison Avenue. Scaffolding slowly taking over the city...😝 #nycthenandnow

1911 & now: NW corner of 27th & Madison Avenue. Scaffolding slowly taking over the city...😝 #nycthenandnow
2,855 23 29 September, 2019
@annswer1108 Profile picture

@annswer1108

My father with me on the east side of Park Avenue between East 169th and 170th Streets in 1950, shot 1. In the background are the NY Central railroad tracks, below street level, and behind them, the backs of the tenements on Brook Avenue. Shot 2 is the same location today, with the Butler housing projects behind the Metro North tracks. #bronxhistory #oldbronx #vintagebronx #bronxnostalgia #bronxmemories #Morrisania #bronxneighborhoods #bronxstreets #bronxnarratives #vanishingnewyork #nycthenandnow #bronxfamilyhistory #vanishingnewyork

My father with me on the east side of Park Avenue between East 169th and 170th Streets in 1950, shot 1.  In the background are the NY Central railroad tracks, below street level, and behind them, the backs of the tenements on Brook Avenue.  Shot 2 is the same location today, with the Butler housing projects behind the Metro North tracks. #bronxhistory #oldbronx #vintagebronx #bronxnostalgia #bronxmemories #Morrisania #bronxneighborhoods #bronxstreets #bronxnarratives #vanishingnewyork #nycthenandnow #bronxfamilyhistory #vanishingnewyork
45 5 28 September, 2019
@old.newyorkcity Profile picture

@old.newyorkcity

1910 - Track level at Penn Station

1910 - Track level at Penn Station
2,900 34 28 September, 2019
@nyc.thenandnow Profile picture

@nyc.thenandnow

Sohotel

1934 & now: West side of Bowery just below Broome Street- facing north. #nycthenandnow

1934 & now: West side of Bowery just below Broome Street- facing north. #nycthenandnow
1,850 13 27 September, 2019
@old.newyorkcity Profile picture

@old.newyorkcity

Norman Thomas High School

1905 - The 71st Regiment Armory at 33rd St and Park Ave. Following the destruction by fire of the previous building, this iteration was built in 1904. It engulfed the whole block from 33 to 34th Sts with a tower modeled on the town hall tower in Siena, Italy. It was used for music and boxing events in the ‘20s and ‘30s. However, It steadily declined into the ‘60s when it was basically abandoned. In 1971 it was demolished to build the Norman Thomas High School, topped by a 42-story orange brick skyscraper.

1905 - The 71st Regiment Armory at 33rd St and Park Ave. Following the destruction by fire of the previous building, this iteration was built in 1904. It engulfed the whole block from 33 to 34th Sts with a tower modeled on the town hall tower in Siena, Italy. It was used for music and boxing events in the ‘20s and ‘30s. However, It steadily declined into the ‘60s when it was basically abandoned. In 1971 it was demolished to build the Norman Thomas High School, topped by a 42-story orange brick skyscraper.
1,820 46 27 September, 2019
@old.newyorkcity Profile picture

@old.newyorkcity

Times Square, New York City

1915 - Times Building in Times Square

1915 - Times Building in Times Square
2,423 18 26 September, 2019
@old.newyorkcity Profile picture

@old.newyorkcity

Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower

1908 - Metropolitan Life Building under construction, near E 23rd Street and Madison Ave, across from Madison Square Park. The tower is modeled after the Campanile in Venice, Italy. It was the world's tallest building until 1913, when it was surpassed by the Woolworth Building. Today the tower is a hotel and the rest is the offices of Credit Suisse.

1908 - Metropolitan Life Building under construction, near E 23rd Street and Madison Ave, across from Madison Square Park. The tower is modeled after the Campanile in Venice, Italy.  It was the world's tallest building until 1913, when it was surpassed by the Woolworth Building.  Today the tower is a hotel and the rest is the offices of Credit Suisse.
1,725 12 25 September, 2019
@urbanarchiveny Profile picture

@urbanarchiveny

Pier 17 Nyc

Middle of the week, maybe you should take a moment to look out over the river and take a breather like these folks in 1890 AND 2019. We are thrilled to have some amazing historical photographs of the waterfront from the @seaportmuseum on the #UrbanArchive app. ⠀
.⠀
What is your favorite spot on the #NYC waterfront? 🌊⛵🌉⠀
.⠀
#urbanarchive #nychistory #nycwaterfront #pier17 #southstreet #seaportmuseum #SSSM #brooklynbridge #thenandnow #nycthenandnow #appfeature

Middle of the week, maybe you should take a moment to look out over the river and take a breather like these folks in 1890 AND 2019. We are thrilled to have some amazing historical photographs of the waterfront from the @seaportmuseum on the #UrbanArchive app. ⠀
.⠀
What is your favorite spot on the #NYC waterfront? 🌊⛵🌉⠀
.⠀
#urbanarchive #nychistory #nycwaterfront #pier17 #southstreet #seaportmuseum #SSSM #brooklynbridge #thenandnow #nycthenandnow #appfeature
1,658 6 25 September, 2019
@timeless_era_ Profile picture

@timeless_era_

#Repost from @nyc.thenandnow with @ming.app .
1934 North side of Canal Street west from Eldridge Street. #nycthenandnow

#Repost from @nyc.thenandnow with @ming.app .
1934 North side of Canal Street west from Eldridge Street. #nycthenandnow
30 0 24 September, 2019
@urbanarchiveny Profile picture

@urbanarchiveny

Long Island City

A Queens Public Library branch in #LongIslandCity then and now! (photo via @nyhistory)⠀
.⠀
The Nelson Branch, Queens Public Library was located at 47-46 11th Street. It was named for William Nelson, whose collection originally established the Long Island City Public Library (which then became @qplnyc in 1899 after the consolidation of New York City in a year earlier). If you squint, you can see the steeple of St. Mary's Catholic Church on Vernon Blvd. in the distance at left (it still stands).⠀
.⠀
Today marks the opening of a new branch library in #LIC, Hunters Point to be specific! While not in the same location (the new #HuntersPoint Branch is on the waterfront at Center Blvd. and 48th Avenue), it will serve the local community just as the Nelson Branch did more than 100 years ago. 📚⠀
.⠀
Hopefully the young visitors to the new branch will have a bit more enthusiasm than the children of 1910! (Swipe through for closeups.😆)⠀
.⠀
.⠀
📸: William D. Hassler⠀
ca. 1910⠀
via @nyhistory
#urbanarchive #nychistory #queens #library #storefront #QPL #branchlibrary #stevenholl #thenandnow #nycthenandnow #stinkface
Join Urban Archive 📱 [link in bio]

A Queens Public Library branch in #LongIslandCity then and now! (photo via @nyhistory)⠀
.⠀
The Nelson Branch, Queens Public Library was located at 47-46 11th Street. It was named for William Nelson, whose collection originally established the Long Island City Public Library (which then became @qplnyc in 1899 after the consolidation of New York City in a year earlier). If you squint, you can see the steeple of St. Mary's Catholic Church on Vernon Blvd. in the distance at left (it still stands).⠀
.⠀
Today marks the opening of a new branch library in #LIC, Hunters Point to be specific! While not in the same location (the new #HuntersPoint Branch is on the waterfront at Center Blvd. and 48th Avenue), it will serve the local community just as the Nelson Branch did more than 100 years ago. 📚⠀
.⠀
Hopefully the young visitors to the new branch will have a bit more enthusiasm than the children of 1910! (Swipe through for closeups.😆)⠀
.⠀
.⠀
📸: William D. Hassler⠀
ca. 1910⠀
via @nyhistory⠀
#urbanarchive #nychistory #queens #library #storefront #QPL #branchlibrary #stevenholl #thenandnow #nycthenandnow #stinkface⠀
Join Urban Archive 📱 [link in bio]
658 10 24 September, 2019

Top #nycthenandnow posts

@nyc.thenandnow Profile picture

@nyc.thenandnow

Wall Street Historic District

1920 & now: On this day almost 100 years ago an unknown man planted a horse-drawn wagon filled with 100lbs of dynamite & 500lbs of small cast-iron weights in the middle of Wall Street during lunch hour. At 12:01 PM the wagon was detonated, killing 38 and leaving 143 seriously injured. This bombing was never solved. Linking an article by @history & more photos in my story. #nycthenandnow

1920 & now: On this day almost 100 years ago an unknown man planted a horse-drawn wagon filled with 100lbs of dynamite & 500lbs of small cast-iron weights in the middle of Wall Street during lunch hour. At 12:01 PM the wagon was detonated, killing 38 and leaving 143 seriously injured. This bombing was never solved. Linking an article by @history & more photos in my story. #nycthenandnow
2,034 54 16 September, 2018
@nyc.thenandnow Profile picture

@nyc.thenandnow

Vape Addiction LES

1934 & now: 166 Orchard Street. Just realized I forgot to post today... so here is a very random post at 1:45AM when I definitely should be sleeping. 🤦🏼‍♀️ #nycthenandnow

1934 & now: 166 Orchard Street. Just realized I forgot to post today... so here is a very random post at 1:45AM when I definitely should be sleeping. 🤦🏼‍♀️ #nycthenandnow
1,440 29 26 September, 2018
@nyc.thenandnow Profile picture

@nyc.thenandnow

Velvet Underground Experience NYC

1965 & now: A group not yet called the Velvet Underground. Taken outside 52 Ludlow- next door from where the band lived & rehearsed at 56 Ludlow. Check out The Velvet Underground Experience pop-up at 718 Broadway before it ends Dec 30th! I went the other day it was very cool. Live music on Thursdays! #nycthenandnow

1965 & now: A group not yet called the Velvet Underground. Taken outside 52 Ludlow- next door from where the band lived & rehearsed at 56 Ludlow. Check out The Velvet Underground Experience pop-up at 718 Broadway before it ends Dec 30th! I went the other day it was very cool. Live music on Thursdays! #nycthenandnow
1,629 27 12 December, 2018
@nyc.thenandnow Profile picture

@nyc.thenandnow

Engine 55

1899 & now: Engine Company 55 in Little Italy. #nycthenandnow

1899 & now: Engine Company 55 in Little Italy. #nycthenandnow
3,104 72 23 December, 2018
@nyc.thenandnow Profile picture

@nyc.thenandnow

Ralph's Ices

1950's & now: Original location of Ralph's Italian Ice- 501 Port Richmond Avenue, Staten Island. Dreaming of summer right now... 🍧🍨 #nycthenandnow

1950's & now: Original location of Ralph's Italian Ice- 501 Port Richmond Avenue, Staten Island. Dreaming of summer right now... 🍧🍨 #nycthenandnow
1,930 36 28 January, 2019
@nyc.thenandnow Profile picture

@nyc.thenandnow

South Street Seaport

1923 & now: NW corner of Peck Slip & Front Street. During the Super Bowl my favorite thing to do is wander the city listening to music. Do it every year lol. I just love how empty the streets get! Honestly feels like you're Will Smith in I Am Legend, it's the greatest. #nycthenandnow

1923 & now: NW corner of Peck Slip & Front Street. During the Super Bowl my favorite thing to do is wander the city listening to music. Do it every year lol. I just love how empty the streets get! Honestly feels like you're Will Smith in I Am Legend, it's the greatest. #nycthenandnow
2,704 39 4 February, 2019
@nyc.thenandnow Profile picture

@nyc.thenandnow

Coleman Square Playground

1938 & now: Girl on a Swing by Walter Rosenblum. Manhattan Bridge in the background. And not to worry everyone- behind me there is still a great park and playground! :) #nycthenandnow

1938 & now: Girl on a Swing by Walter Rosenblum. Manhattan Bridge in the background. And not to worry everyone- behind me there is still a great park and playground! :) #nycthenandnow
2,869 37 14 October, 2019
@nyc.thenandnow Profile picture

@nyc.thenandnow

Starbucks

1933 & now: SE corner of Grove Street & 7th Avenue. #nycthenandnow

1933 & now: SE corner of Grove Street & 7th Avenue. #nycthenandnow
3,595 59 27 December, 2018
@nyc.thenandnow Profile picture

@nyc.thenandnow

Lower East Side

1934 & now: A pickle peddler pushing pickles on the corner of Delancey & Allen Street. #nycthenandnow

1934 & now: A pickle peddler pushing pickles on the corner of Delancey & Allen Street. #nycthenandnow
3,147 85 7 February, 2019